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Archives for August 2014

Three simple ways to give Millennials the feedback they want

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Here’s an excerpt from my latest column in the Huffington Post:

“Is feedback really as important to Millennials as we’ve heard?” The accounting senior manager asked me in a workshop I was giving on best work practices for each generation.

Yes, I told them. Millennials’ expectations are different from the older generations’. Millennials grew up with highly involved parents coaching them, instant access online to grades, and thousands of texts with their friends. Mentoring programs are one of the top two soft benefits Millennials look for at an organization. Less than one in ten Millennials think weekly communication is enough. In fact, 35 percent want it multiple times a day, while 25 percent think once a day is fine.

“Especially if you’re a Boomer, take the amount of feedback you would want, and then double it. Then double it again, and you’ll meet the Millennials halfway,” I said.

The group erupted in an audible moan. One manager said what the others were clearly thinking: “I’m already working way too much. How am I going to find the time to give Millennials all the feedback they want?”

One of the biggest challenges to feedback is that we’re making it too difficult. You can give more feedback without adding another two hours to your day….

Read my entire column here.

[Image via blog.cuvitt.com]

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Four approaches to dealing with four generations

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The approach we take in dealing with the four generations determines the results we get. You, your boss, and your organization are using one of these four approaches – but which should be used to get the desired outcomes?

  1. Ignore them

    If you want to ignore generational issues, it’s easy: don’t hire people you don’t understand. Hire people like you… until they’re all dead.

    When a generation first hits the workplace, it’s easiest to ignore them. Their numbers are small, so they’re easy to miss. Even more, since they are a minority, they tend to adapt to the dress, communication styles, and approaches of the other generations. They’re wearing flip flops in the car to work, but changing before they walk in – and we are fooled into thinking that because they don’t complain about the work dress code, they don’t have a problem with it.

    I had taught about half my session in Phoenix when a man approached me and said that based on what he had learned about the generations, he had decided to hire only Baby Boomers (or Generation Xers who thought like Boomers) until he flipped his business in five years. I told him he had best find a stupid buyer for his business, because he didn’t have a sustainable business model. He hadn’t thought about passing on the knowledge of his company to younger generations. But this example is not an extreme one. In the past year, I’ve heard fifty managers or executives tell me they are done hiring Millennials.

    But with close to 50% of post-college Millennials already in the workplace, it’s hard to ignore them. And once we can no longer ignore a generation, we have three remaining choices….

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